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Is there a test to see if you will get Alzheimer's

There is not a test to see if you will get Alzheimer’s. However, there are tests that can be done to see if you have a genetic predisposition for the disease.
exams Alzheimer's

What eye exams can tell you about Alzheimer’s disease?

Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), a new type of precise and non-invasive imaging, has facilitated much of the current research into the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on the eyes. OCTA allows doctors to see the tiniest blood vessels at the back of the eye, which are as thin as a human hair. These vessels are known to be some of the first to be impacted by diseases like Alzheimer’s.

One study found that people with Alzheimer’s had a thinner central retinal artery than people without the disease. The central retinal artery supplies blood to the retina, so a thinner artery could mean that the retina isn’t getting enough blood and isn’t functioning properly.

OCTA can also show changes in the blood vessels in the choroid, which is the layer of blood vessels between the retina and the white of the eye. In Alzheimer’s, the choroid becomes thinner and less dense. This could be because the disease is affecting the small vessels in the choroid, making them less able to carry blood.

Studies have also shown that people with Alzheimer’s have alterations in the way their blood vessels function. These changes include increased leakiness of the vessels, and changes in the way the vessels contract and dilate. These changes can lead to impaired blood supply to the retina and other parts of the eye, and may contribute to the vision problems that people with Alzheimer’s often experience.

What’s your real risk for Alzheimer’s?

Griffin explains, “The biggest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is age. After age 65, the risk of Alzheimer’s doubles every five years. After age 85, the risk reaches nearly one-third.” “Another common risk factor is genetics,” says Griffin. “If a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) has the disease, your risk is greater.”4

SmokingSmoking is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. A 2018 study published in JAMA Neurology found that people who smoke are more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, than people who have never smoked.5

High blood pressureHigh blood pressure is a risk factor for both stroke and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. A 2017 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that people with high blood pressure were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those with normal blood pressure.6

DiabetesPeople with diabetes have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. A 2017 study published in JAMA Neurology found that people with diabetes were more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, than people without diabetes.7

DepressionDepression is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. A 2017 study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that people with depression were more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those without depression.8

Sleep apneaSleep apnea is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. A 2018 study published in JAMA Neurology found that people with sleep apnea were more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, than people without sleep apnea.9

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, there is currently no test to definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. However, there are a number of tests and procedures that can be used to rule out other conditions and confirm an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. These include cognitive and memory tests, brain imaging scans, and genetic tests. Your doctor will likely recommend a combination of these tests if you are showing symptoms of Alzheimer’s.